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Protecting Your Children’s Future

Who needs a Will? It is logical that everyone would be better off with planning for their estate, and today we want to focus specifically on families with kids. While nobody wants to sit down and think about what happens to their kids if they suddenly, and unexpectedly, die, there are many important reasons to do so.

  • First of all, as a parent we know you want what is best for your children. In your mind you probably have ideas about whether you would want your kids to be raised by a friend, godparent, or your favorite aunt. Without a Will, the state has no way of knowing who you would trust to raise your kids.
  • Second, it is unlikely that the state would pick the worst person in your family to take on the task, but creating a Will ensures that your wishes are considered!
  • Finally, you may admire the way your aunt loves and dotes on your children, but perhaps your accountant brother would be a better person to manage the assets that your child may now inherit upon your death.

A Will allows you to create some distinctions about who manages what aspects of your child’s life until they become an adult.

It is hard to predict all the nuances that you might want to spell out in a Will, and we at Dagger Law recommend that you sit down with an attorney to ensure that your wishes and intentions are clearly defined, and allowed, under the law. We are here to help you protect your assets, and your children’s future, today.

Time and Patience: Both Are Necessary in Legal Events

time and patience

Time is a finite resource. You can’t make more, you can’t trade for more, and whether we work hard or lay on the couch, the cost in time is constant.

We seem to be aware of the value of time at a subconscious level. Ever feel yourself impatiently frowning at the slow-moving car in front of you even when you have nowhere to be? We are aware that those extra seconds in the car matter, and we could be spending them elsewhere.

So why all the talk about time? Because legal work often takes time. Unlike the car in the scenario above, most of us can’t see the cause for delay in our legal case, and that can be frustrating. While we could go through a laundry list of causes for this, it is perhaps just best to state that working through a legal issue requires patience.

So, what should you do if you are feeling impatient?

First, we would recommend that you become familiar with your attorney’s staff. Asking questions like “what step in the process is we on” can be answered by staff members. They can typically see when the paperwork has been filed in court when your attorney is researching or drafting documents and can see important hearing dates and deadlines if they have been set.

We understand that waiting for the final word on a life-changing legal event can be difficult. If you have questions you want answered, please call and schedule an appointment today

Dagger Law Employee Retires from U.S. Navy

Bryan M. Everitt, AssociateLancaster, Ohio – Bryan Everitt, attorney at Dagger Law, is retiring from a 24-year career in the United States Navy effective May 26. He served as a nuclear-trained submarine warfare officer and as the Operations Officer at the Navy Recruiting District in Columbus.

“We are honored by the sacrifices Bryan has made for our country,” said Jeff Spangler, managing partner of Dagger Law. “We have a history of supporting our military and we are proud of everything Bryan has accomplished.”

While at Dagger Law, Everitt served as a Lieutenant Commander in the Navy Reserves, where he was a Watch Floor Battle Officer for Anti-Submarine Warfare operations. He served in various locations, including San Diego where he aided the arrival of a Chilean submarine and then assisted the sailors at the base.

Everitt graduated with honors from the United States Naval Academy, obtained his master’s degree from Old Dominion University and then received his law degree from Capital University Law School in 2013. In 2017, Everitt was named Young Professional of the Year by the Lancaster-Fairfield County Chamber of Commerce.  

Courts, Child Welfare Partners Coordinate Efforts regarding Foster Care

By Csaba Sukosd | March 25, 2019

Every year, thousands of children in Ohio are impacted by the judicial system through no fault of their own. It’s a reality that compels courts and child welfare agencies to coordinate their efforts to ensure the safety and stability of such juveniles who end up in foster care.

On Thursday, representatives from across the state came to the Thomas J. Moyer Ohio Judicial Center to focus on abuse, neglect, and dependency dockets. The goal of the caseflow management course – hosted by the Ohio Supreme Court in conjunction with the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services and its Office of Families and Children – was to streamline practices with the goal of helping children find stable and permanent outcomes regarding where they live and who takes care of them as a guardian.

Read the full article in Court News Ohio

Vacationing with children post-divorce

by | Mar 7, 2019 | Timely Topics |

In addition to divvying up the finances, many couples spend the majority of the divorce process discussing the custody of their children. In most cases, parents create a shared parenting plan that lays out the details of their arrangement. Unfortunately, vacation time – and any time away from school – is often overlooked. It’s much easier to agree on the day-to-day whereabouts of the kids.

With spring break and summer vacation on the horizon, here are a few things to discuss with your ex.

  1. Plan far in advance. Regardless of how flexible your daily custody arrangement is, vacation time should be determined far enough in advance to allow ample time for planning. Summer vacation days, spring break and other vacations should be divided evenly between both parents. An every-other-year approach to certain holidays works well, too.
  1. Share the details. When taking your children on a vacation, it’s important to communicate the details of your trip to your ex. He or she has a right to know where you’re going and for how long, as well as information about how to reach you. If you’re leaving the country, you will also need a signed and notarized travel consent form from your ex.

Read the full article here