Ohio Employer Required Posters

by Jeff J. Spangler

Numerous state and federal laws require Ohio employers to post specific employment related signs throughout the workplace. The required posters are designed to ensure that employees are aware of guidelines and laws that could affect them in the workplace. Certain posters are required of all Ohio employers; other posters are unique to certain industries.

The Ohio Fair Employment Practices Law poster is required to be posted by all employers in the workplace. This mandatory poster generally states that Ohio law prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, religion, sex, age, military service, nationality, and other protected classes, and that the Ohio Civil Rights Commission is available to investigate any employee complaints.

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Easement Case Closed by Bryan Everitt

“A farm is more than land and crops. It is a family’s heritage and future.”

Dagger Law and Hocking Valley Title recently closed an agricultural easement from the Ohio Department of Agriculture. These cases are often long and complex, but are a tremendous benefit for local farmers and the community.

The purpose of an easement is to preserve farmland which has often been in the family for generations.

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Marijuana Laws in Ohio: Impact on Employers

by Jeff. J. Spangler

In recent years, the use and legality of marijuana accelerated to the forefront as one of the most talked about legal topics. In 2016, Ohio enacted a bill that partially legalizes medicinal marijuana use throughout the state. Recreational use of marijuana remains illegal. Numerous employment sector questions were specifically addressed in the Ohio law.

In 2016, Ohio House Bill 523 was signed into law, making it legal for doctors to prescribe marijuana for medical purposes. After two years, the law mandates a state-run system with dispensaries to buy the marijuana, and regulates producers. As the law currently stands, there can be as many as 60 dispensaries and 24 growers throughout the state. While medicinal marijuana is not yet widely available in Ohio, employers can expect growth in use and availability in the coming months.

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The Impact Of Divorce On Our Community

by Norman J. Ogilvie, Jr.

The termination of marriage, although a common occurrence, has the effect on society like throwing a pebble into a pond, creating ripples and disruption to its smooth surface.

A divorce affects not only the parties, but also the children, grandparents, cousins, neighbors, workplaces, teachers, banks, creditors, friends, and sometimes social services agencies.

It impacts the husband and wife by consuming their thoughts, affecting them both physically and emotionally. The stress caused to participants is only exceeded by the death of a child. It is important to share with your medical providers any symptoms such as lack of sleep or inability to focus. Seeking professional counseling and therapy is encouraged and looked upon by the Courts as an indication of common sense and good parenting skills.

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New Developments in Ohio Gun Laws

As of March 21, 2017 a new Ohio law has allowed for more situations where carrying a concealed firearm is permissible. This new law does not change the process for obtaining a concealed carry license. For some brief background, in order for someone to obtain a concealed carry license in Ohio they must be at least 21 years old, be an Ohio resident for at least 45 days, and be a resident of their county for at least 30 days. Additionally, an individual must satisfy certain educational requirements; typically this is met by completing a course of instructions that includes at least 8 hours of training with a minimum of 2 hours of in-person training and range time. Other type of military or law enforcement training may also meet this educational requirement. After satisfying these initial conditions, the applicant must contact the local sheriff where he or she will complete a background check, provide fingerprints, verify an acceptable form of I.D., collect required payment for the license, and review the application and educational requirements of the individual. After this, the sheriff will determine whether or not to issue the concealed carry license, and if he or she grants it, the individual is a licensed concealed carrier for 5 years.

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