3 Tips if You’re Involved in a Car Accident

In 2017, the Ohio Department of Public Safety reported that there were more than 303,000 traffic crashes and more than 108,000 of those resulted in some injury to the involved parties.

Jacob Cook's car after a head on accidentThese are staggering numbers, and, unfortunately, that means that many of us are going to experience this traumatic event; whether that is personally being involved in an accident or knowing someone who was involved.

Do you know what to do if you, or a loved one, are involved in an accident?

Dagger Law attorneys recommend the following as a quick checklist:
1) Report the accident immediately. Ensure that police and, if needed, emergency medical services are called, at a minimum.
2) Start keeping records. Take pictures, get statements, ask for a copy of the police report, and get the other driver’s insurance information. All of this information will be important for your insurance settlement, or evidence if there is a court appearance required.
3) Protect your rights! This is very important; do not admit fault, do not give a statement to your insurance company, and contact an attorney at your earliest convenience. An attorney who is familiar with auto and truck accidents will know how to best protect your rights and preserve your best chance for a fair settlement from an insurance company.

Ohio-based court rules tire-chalking for parking enforcement unconstitutional

The age-old parking-enforcement practice of tire-chalking is unconstitutional, a federal appeals court in Cincinnati ruled Monday, saying that it violated the Fourth Amendment’s prohibition of unreasonable searches.

A three-judge panel of the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, in a first-of-its-kind decision, ruled that marking a car’s tires to gather information is a form of trespass requiring a warrant, similar to police attaching a GPS to a vehicle to track a suspected drug dealer.

Parking attendants across the country have been chalking tires with big white lines for decades in zones without meters to enforce time limits and issue tickets. It’s a substantial source of revenue for many cities.

The decision, while undoubtedly bringing joy to parking scofflaws everywhere, could cost some cities money, either from lost revenue or having to install more meters.

On the other hand, as Fourth Amendment expert Orin Kerr of the University of Southern California law school tweeted, it “seems easy enough these days for parking enforcers to just take a photo of the car, or even just a close-up photo of the tire, rather than chalk it. … No 4A issues then.”

Read the full article in The Columbus Dispatch:Ohio-Based Court Rules Tire-Chalking for Parking Enforcement Unconstitutional .

Ohio’s Efforts to Form Opioid Pact Repeated in New England

By Csaba Sukosd | March 13, 2019 – Court News Ohio

The Ohio Supreme Court initiative that brought eight states together to fight the opioid epidemic is being replicated by the six New England states.

Chief justices from Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont have formed the New England Regional Judicial Opioid Initiative (NE RJOI).

Ohio Supreme Court Chief Justice Maureen O’Connor and fellow chief justices, government, law enforcement, health officials and academics from Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, North Carolina, Tennessee, and West Virginia convened in Cincinnati in August 2016 to create the Regional Judicial Opioid Initiative (RJOI).

Read the full article here.

Opinion: Stop Michigan counties’ unconstitutional stealing

Can Oakland County confiscate a citizen’s personal property for $8.41 in unpaid taxes? This question will likely be answered by the Michigan Supreme Court later this year.

The case at hand involves Uri Rafaeli, who failed to pay the interest owed on property taxes for a rental property in Southfield several years ago. Oakland County eventually foreclosed on his property for the $8.41 plus $277 in additional interest and fees. Similarly, Oakland County seized Andre Ohanessian’s property in Orchard Village for a $6,000 tax debt.

The county proceeded to auction Rafaeli’s property for $24,500 and Ohanessian’s property for $82,000 — and then kept the surplus proceeds. Lower state courts have agreed the officials acted properly under Michigan’s General Property Tax Act, which requires officials to take property for any amount of unpaid taxes and keep all the proceeds if they sell it.

Read the full Stop Michigan counties’ Unconstitutional Stealing Article.

By Joe Barnett, Detroit News

If you, or a loved one, owe back taxes we recommend that you call a Dagger Law Tax attorney today, or please use our ATTORNEY CONTACT FORM

Norman J. Ogilvie, Jr. Receives George D. Martin Professionalism Award

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – May 17, 2018

Lancaster, Ohio – Today, Dagger Law Of Counsel Norman J. Ogilvie, Jr. was recognized by the Fairfield County Bar Association for his high standards of professionalism as a recipient of the George D. Martin Professionalism Award.

George D. Martin (1907-1993) was a man of uncommon personal and professional integrity. Having graduated Harvard Law School in 1933, he practiced law in Lancaster until 1986. Upon his retirement he was a volunteer law clerk of the Common Pleas Court.

The award criteria states the recipient should be the consummate professional George was and be a dedicated practitioner of law and whose integrity is unquestionable. The recipient should have a history of promoting respect for the law and be active in the community.

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